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Kevin M Kelly, PhD
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Archaeological Field Schools
List your Archaeological Field School Here: Contact Kevin-Kelly@UIowa.Edu
 

March thru November 2014 [Multiple Projects]: The Sanisera Field School - International Archaeological Courses - Menorca (Spain)

May Thru September 2014 [Multiple Projects]: The Balkan Heritage Field School (Bulgaria & Macedonia)

May 12-August 15, 2014: Irish Archaeology Field School - 13th century Black Friary (Ireland)

May 19-31, 2014: Historical Archaeology Field Program, Alexandria, Virginia (USA)

May19-June 6, 2014: Archaeological Field School - Woodpecker Cave, Iowa (USA)

June 1 - July 5, 2014: Excavation: Roman Provincial - Life by the Imperial Road (Romania)

June 2-June 27, 2014: Berry Site Field School at Fort San Juan (North Carolina, USA)

June 6-July 10, 2014: Barcelona-La Roca dels Bous 2014 (Neanderthals) (Spain)

June 7-July 5, 2014: Betty Hope Field School, Antigua, Caribbean [California State, Chico)
Application Deadline: April 4, 2014

June 8-July 5, 2014: Excavation: Medieval Funerary - Lost Churches Project: Living and Dying on the Edge of Europe (Romania) - Session 1

June 8-July 5, 2014: Osteology Workshop: Late Medieval ”Crisis” Populations – The Remaking of the European Frontier (Romania)

June 8-July 19, 2014: EXCAVATIONS OF THE BATHS AT ROMAN CARSULAE (ITALY)

June 9-28, 2014: Cerro de la Muela [Roman castelium] (Spain) - Session 1

June 10-July 15, 2014: Coastal Archaeology Field School on Ossabaw Island, Georgia (USA)

June 23-August 15, 2014: 2014 OSU Archaeology and Geoarchaeology Field School at the Cooper's Ferry Site, Idaho

June 30-August 1, 2014: Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison Field School in Historical Archaeology (Ohio, USA)

July 6-July 26, 2014: Vada Volaterrana Harbour Project (Italy)

July 6-July 26, 2014: Excavation: Medieval Funerary - Lost Churches Project: Living and Dying on the Edge of Europe (Romania) - Session 2

July 6-August 2, 2014: Bioarchaeology of Children Osteology Workshop: Victims of Change – Lost Churches Project (Romania)

July 12-27, 2014: Nautical Archaeology International Field School at Northwestern Michigan College (USA)

July 18-August 15, 2014: Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Field School (California, USA)

July 24-August 31, 2014: Archaeological Field School on Rebun Island, Japan

August 4-23, 2014: Cerro de la Muela [Roman castelium] (Spain) - Session 2

Dates continuing into 2015: Institute for Field Research [Multiple Projects & Locations]

List your Archaeological Field School Here: Contact Kevin-Kelly@UIowa.Edu
 
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EXCAVATIONS OF THE BATHS AT ROMAN CARSULAE (ITALY): June 8-July 19, 2014
We are still accepting applications from students and volunteers to participate in our ninth season of the excavations of the baths at Roman Carsulae. The application deadline has been extended to April 15, 2014.

We plan to spend the summer excavating the remainder of the bath building under the protective roof as well as the region immediately to the east, where in recent years we have uncovered more rooms. We will also collaborate with our colleagues with the San Gemini Preservation Studies program and the Soprintendenza of Umbria on a plan for the conservation of the bath building.

Our field school welcomes both students and volunteers. Participants are instructed in excavation strategies, techniques and recording, the formulation of research questions and priorities, identification and handling of artifacts, drafting of site plans, and analytical rendering. Regularly scheduled lectures are given by both our objects conservator and ceramics analyst on such topics as conservation in the field and lab, the history of ceramics in Italy, and Roman architectural construction methods and materials. Throughout the season, participants are given the opportunity to work with our conservator in the lab cleaning and consolidating small finds, or in the field helping to conserve the mosaics we have discovered over the course of the excavations.

For further details such as cost, housing and the schedule, and to apply, please visit our website.

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Nautical Archaeology International Field School at Northwestern Michigan College (USA): July 12-27, 2014
Join members of the Nautical Archaeology Society, divers, educators, students and fellow underwater archaeology enthusiasts for two weeks of training in beautiful Traverse City Michigan. Classes will be held at Northwestern Michigan College’s waterfront Great Lakes Campus.

Come train on the Great Lakes with experts in the field of Underwater Archaeology. Each of the course instructors are qualified professionals in their field of study and will be sharing their years of experience with you. This is a great chance to do some sunny summer diving and get some fantastic training too!

The dates of the field school are July 12 – July 27, 2014.

Most of the detailed information concerning the field school can be accessed via the internet at: www.nasnmc.com. Under the 2014 NAS Field School tab at the top of the main page you can find information on: the aims and objectives of the field school, course schedule, frequently asked questions, prices and package deals, online payment option and a printable flyer.

There are many class options and both package deals and al-a-carte pricing are available. You may attend just a single day-long class or the entire two-week long event. Feel free to sign up for courses as your schedule allows.

These are great courses to have on your resume if you are considering a post-graduate degree in anthropology.

Academic Credit at Northwestern Michigan College

The NAS Part 1 and NAS Part 2 courses can be taken for academic credit at Northwestern Michigan College. Each course is worth 3 anthropology or social science credits.

You may sign up for these credit courses online at: http://www.nmc.edu/student-services/records-registration/getting-things-done/registration-information.html

The NAS Part 1 (Introduction to Foreshore and Underwater Archaeology)
ANT 201 – CRN 1246

NAS Part 2 (Certificate in Foreshore and Underwater Archaeology)
ANT 202 – CRN 1220

If you need assistance you may also call NMC registration at: 231-995-1049.
Or visit their web site at: http://www.nmc.edu/student-services/records-registration/contact-records.html
  • Courses Offered:
    • Introduction to Nautical Archaeology
    • NAS Level One Certification
    • NAS Level Two Field Project
    • NAS Level Three Classes:
      • Archaeological Surveying using a total station
      • Artifact Drawing and Archaeological Illustration
      • Documentary Research
      • Flint Knapping
      • Native American Settlement in the Upper Great Lakes
      • Rov Construction
      • Ship and Boat Construction
      • Underwater and Artifact Photography
      • Using Site Recorder 4 (Archaeological site drawing software)
      • Video Editing in Archaeology

Detailed directions to the NMC campus are provided on the web site. There is a fairly large airport in Traverse City, which has daily flights to both Detroit and Chicago.

Very reasonably priced accommodation in the NMC student dormitories can be purchased at your request, but these spaces are filling fast, so book now to avoid disappointment. There are also many hotels in the local area but these will be both expensive and full during the field-school so book early to avoid disappointment.

We hope you will join us for what promises to be a unique training opportunity and all around good time!

Please email mholley@shianet.org or call 989-307-9651 if you have any questions.

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Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison Field School in Historical Archaeology (Ohio, USA): June 30-August 1, 2014
History
From April of 1862 until September of 1865, over 10,000 Confederates passed through Johnson’s Island Civil War Military Prison leaving behind an extensive historical and archaeological record. One of the unique aspects of the prison is it only held officers. The 16.5 acre Johnson’s Island Prison Compound contained 13 Blocks (12 prisoner housing units and one as a hospital), latrines, Sutler stand, 3 wells, pest house, 2 large mess halls and more. There were more than 40 buildings outside the stockade (barns, stables, a lime kiln, forts, barracks for officers, a powder magazine, etc.) used by the 128th Ohio Volunteer Infantry to guard the prison. Two major fortifications (Forts Johnson and Hill) were constructed over the 1864/65 winter, and were operational by March of 1865. The prisoners on Johnson’s Island endured harsh winters, food and fuel shortages, disease, along with the mental anguish of uncertainty about their families and their own futures. Current research suggests that close to 250 prisoners died on Johnson’s Island during the war.

Investigation
Since the spring of 1989, Dr. David R. Bush has been investigating the Johnson's Island Civil War Prison. The site is located on a small island in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie (just north of Cedar Point Amusement Park). Past research has allowed us to specifically locate many of the special use areas of the prison. During the summer of 2014 we will be continuing our investigations of Block 8 of the Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison Compound. Block 8 was a general housing block with a number of fairly notorious individuals incarcerated there. One of the unique features of Block 8 was its use for theatrical performances of the “Rebellonians”. Also in Block 8 was William Peel, one of a handful of prisoners that became expert in the production of hard rubber jewelry. The summer’s search will include items related to these activities as well as general materials required by the POWs for survival, in the status they were accustomed to.

We will continue working on Feature 124, a sink (latrine) associated with the early occupation of Block 8. The southern half of the latrine was excavated in 2010, and the northern half was started in 2011. About one-quarter of the southern half of this latrine remains to be excavated. We expect to continue to find items related to their maintaining their Southern lifestyle and also a large amount of animal remains. The 1862 latrines have produced unusual amounts of beef bones in the past. Finally, the research will continue in the Heidelberg University Archaeology Laboratory two nights a week with the field school students conducting preliminary analyses of materials excavated.

Field School Information:
Heidelberg University is offering a five week field school for undergraduate college students, graduating high school seniors (2014 grads), incoming first year college students, non-traditional adult students, and degree holding students for either 6 hours of academic credit or for the experience only (Audit) where no academic credit hours are earned. This is an excellent opportunity to gain archaeological experience as well as learn about the American Civil War and the prison system. In addition to the field experience, there will be laboratory sessions in the archaeological laboratory on the Heidelberg University campus. Participants in the field school will gain experience in basic excavation techniques, on-site photography, the recording of archaeological data, and the identification and conservation of historic cultural materials. Students will work at the site Monday through Friday (8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) for five weeks.

Application Deadline is June 20, 2014

Tuition/Fees:
You can enroll in the field school courses to earn 6 hours of academic credit ($3020.00) or for the field experience only (no academic credit hours are earned) for $1595.00. Housing is additional and is $450.00 for a 5-week stay.

For more detailed information, please contact:

David R. Bush, Ph.D., Director
Center for Historic & Military Archaeology
Heidelberg University
310 E. Market Street
Tiffin, Ohio 44883
dbush@heidelberg.edu

2014 Summer Field School Booklet

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Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Field School (California, USA): July 18-August 15, 2014

The Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Field School is a collaborative research project with Tongva/Gabrielino tribal members, the Santa Catalina Island Conservancy and California State University, Northridge. The field school runs from July 18, 2014 to August 15, 2014 and is Register of Professional Archaeologists (RPA) certified.

In our seventh year, the field school provides students with practical working knowledge of survey, excavation, lab and cataloging methods while immersing them in the 9,000 years of prehistoric maritime history of the Tongva/Gabrielino nation. Students will also learn about how to apply cultural resource laws to public sector archaeological work.

Situated just off the coast of Los Angeles, Catalina Island was historically an important trading supply outpost for Southern California and beyond. The field school is part of the on-going Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Project (PCIAP), which is working to assess and protect archaeological sites on Catalina.

For More Information:

See: http://www.pimu.weebly.com

Please contact Wendy Teeter at wendy.teeter@csun.edu or at (310) 825- 1864 if you would like to participate.

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Berry Site Field School at Fort San Juan (North Carolina, USA): June 2-June 27, 2014
Location: North Carolina, USA
Dates: June 2-June 27, 2014
Time Period: Sixteenth Century, Native American and Spanish Contact
[Archaeological Excavation of Fort San Juan, 1567, the First European Settlement in the Interior of the United States]
Instructors: Dr. David Moore, Warren Wilson College; Dr. Robin Beck, University of Michigan; Dr. Christopher Rodning, Tulane University
Field School Website: http://www.warren-wilson.edu/~arch/fsregistration
Contact: dmoore@warren-wilson.edu

Click here for field school flyer.

Following the conquest of the Aztecs in Mexico and the Inka in South America, Spain looked to "La Florida" for more land and riches. Hernando de Soto and his army traveled from Florida through North Carolina in 1540 on their way to the Mississippi River. In 1566, Juan Pardo left the Spanish town of St. Elena on the South Carolina coast and traveled into North Carolina in search of an overland route to Mexico. Scholars have debated the routes of Soto and Pardo for years but archaeological investigations at the Berry site (31BK22), north of Morganton in Burke County, provide evidence that both of these Spanish expeditions passed through the Catawba River valley.

The Berry site is a large (nearly 12 acres) Mississippian site that dates to the Burke phase (15th and 16th centuries A.D.) and is believed to represent an ancestral Catawba Indian town. We believe this site to be the location of the native town of Joara, at which Pardo built Fort San Juan in 1567 (20 years before the English "Lost Colony" at Roanoke). The 2014 archaeology field school will concentrate on a one-acre area where 16th century Spanish artifacts and the remains of five burned buildings have been located. We believe these structures represent the remains of a portion of the Spanish compound. In June, 2013, field school participants helped to uncover the first direct evidence of Fort San Juan itself, a portion of the moat surrounding the fort. Pardo named the Spanish settlement Cuenca, after his hometown in Spain. Cuenca and Fort San Juan represent the earliest European settlement in the interior of what is now the United States. Participants in the 2014 field school will continue to explore the new evidence for Fort San Juan.

Tuition: Enrollment is available for a non-credit participant fee of $300.00 per week and you may enroll for 1-4 weeks. Tuition for college credit is $607.50 per week (one credit hour). Children aged 14-15 years may enroll if accompanied by an enrolled adult. Children 16 years of age and older may enroll on their own.

Accommodations: David Moore and those students enrolled for academic credit will stay at the Wall Center for Archaeological Research in Morganton (about a 20 minute drive to the site) during the field school. The Wall Center is the home of the Exploring Joara Foundation, a non-profit organization formed in 2007 to support the field school and to create a regional public archaeology program. The Center is a newly converted 4600 square foot office building which now includes dormitory space for 23 students and staff, along with office and lab space. There is a large kitchen and dining area and we will have a designated open room for hanging out. There are two large dorm rooms for up to eight people and four smaller rooms for up to 4 people. Bunk beds and mattresses will be available for everyone. It is possible there will be room at the Wall Center for non-credit participants as well. There is a weekly $70.00 housing fee. This fee includes the cost of dinners Monday – Thursday.

Please contact David Moore if you wish to consider staying at the Wall Center. If you need additional information about local accommodations, please contact David Moore.

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Archaeological Field School on Rebun Island, Japan: July 24-August 31, 2014
Application Deadline: March 14, 2014

Project Description: Under the direction of Dr. Andrzej Weber, the Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta, will be offering a 6-credit Archaeological Field School (ANTHR 396) on Rebun Island, Japan. This field school will be hosted by the Baikal-Hokkaido Archaeology Project (BHAP), which is an international collaborative research initiative exploring hunter-gatherer lifeways in Northeast Asia.

 For more information, please visit http://bhap.artsrn.ualberta.ca/fieldwork-2014

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Institute for Field Research [Multiple Projects & Locations: Dates continuing into 2015
The Institute for Field Research is now offering 28 archaeological field schools around the world, including China, Colombia, Egypt, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, Oman, Panama, Peru, Philippines, South Africa, Spain, Tanzania, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, and the US.

For more information about each field school, visit our website: http://www.ifrglobal.org/

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2014 OSU Archaeology and Geoarchaeology Field School at the Cooper's Ferry Site, Idaho: June 23-August 15, 2014
Description: The Oregon State University Archaeology and Geoarchaeology Field School will be returning to continue excavation of early Western Stemmed Tradition components (possibly dating to 11,410 radiocarbon years old) at the Cooper's Ferry site during the summer of 2014 from June 23 to August 15th. During this eight week session, students learn state of the art excavation and recordation methods, including the use of total station surveying instruments, 3D scanning of excavation features and stratigraphy, wireless digital data entry of finds, and portable x-ray fluorescence devices. This year, we'll also bring our new Geoprobe coring rig into the field to provide students with an introduction to the study of geoarchaeological records at landscape scales from cored stratigraphic sequences.

Accommodations: We will stay in a field camp near the site, where kitchen, shower, and toilet facilities will be provided. Students will stay in tents they provide. There are no costs for camping. Student will provide their own food, which can be purchased at local grocery stores. Transportation will be provided in the field and vehicles will drive from Corvallis, OR to the field site near Cottonwood, ID.

Tuition: Undergraduate and graduate credit for students is provided through Oregon State University. Tuition costs for undergraduates are $2459 for 12 quarter credits of ANTH 438 and $4246 for 9 credits of graduate level ANTH 538.

Project Director: Dr. Loren Davis, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Oregon State University; loren.davis@oregonstate.edu

For more information, visit our website at: http://oregonstate.edu/cla/anthropology/2012-coopers-ferry

Learn more about the Cooper's Ferry project from our YouTube channel at: http://www.youtube.com/user/CoopersFerrySite

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Coastal Archaeology Field School on Ossabaw Island, Georgia (USA):  June 10-July 15, 2014
Instructor: Dr. Victor D. Thompson, University of Georgia, Department of Anthropology
Field School Website: http://victordomini0.wix.com/coastal-georgia-arch
Dates: June 10th - July 15th, 2014

 This field school will take place on the Georgia Atlantic Coast on Ossabaw Island, which is about five hours by car from Athens. Access to the island is by boat only. Once on the island, students will reside in tents and communal style living with shared meals and duties. Bathroom and kitchen facilities will be on-site.

The south end of the island will be the focus of the 2014 field school. The site contains archaeological midden deposits dating from Archaic up to plantation period components. Our objectives during this summer of field work is to document and record this interesting multi-component site as it is actively eroding into the creek bank. Students will learn about research design and implementation, basic archaeological field methods, shallow geophysical survey, topographic mapping, laboratory methods, and the archaeology of the Southeastern United States. During the field school students will gain skills in shovel test survey, block excavations, and participate in a large-scale shallow geophysical survey using a RM-85 resistance meter as well as a SIR 3000 ground penetrating radar.

For more information contact Dr. Victor Thompson

  • Tuition - 12 Credit Hours (in state), 6 Credit Hours (out of state) check with the University of Georgia Registrar's office for in-state and out-of-state rates.
  • All housing and transport to and from the island from the mainland will be made available to students. However, as the island is remote, students will not be able to leave the island during the week.
  • There will be an additional fee of $40 per week for food.
  •  Please visit UGA Anthropology website for more information about archaeology field schools offered.
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Vada Volaterrana Harbour Project (Italy): July 6-July 26, 2014
Location: Vada, Leghorn, Tuscany, Italy
Season Dates: July 6, 2014 - July 26, 2014
Application Deadline to subscribe: June 23, 2014
Website: http://www.diggingvada.com

Cost: €1,920 ($2,500) for 3 weeks (the cost does not include airfare to/from Italy)

Academic Credit:
Name of institution offering credit: Pisa University
Number of credits offered: 6 Pisa Univ. credits offered (150 hours). The Laboratory of Ancient Topography of the University of Pisa will issue signed certificates for all the activities made during the Field School, specifying type and hours.
Tuition: None

Room and Board Arrangements: Students and staff will stay in a new agritourism, housed inside a restored tipical Tuscany farmhouse, located in the countryside East of the town of Rosignano Solvay (municipality of Rosignano Marittimo, Leghorn), close to the railway station (2 miles/3,2 km far), the city center (2,2 miles/ 3,5 kmfar; ) and the beach (3 miles/4,8 km far).

Contact information:
Dr. Stefano Genovesi
e.mail diggingvada@gmail.com
phone number +39 3384755644

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Barcelona-La Roca dels Bous 2014 (Neanderthals) (Spain): June 6-July 10, 2014
Program: Roca dels Bous
Location: Spain (Europe)

This program is divided into two parts. In the first one the participants will carry out archaeological work -fieldwork, laboratory and theory- in the Neanderthal archaeological site of La Roca dels Bous, in Sant Llorenç de Montgai (Spain), which forms part of the European Project POCTEFA. Here, we will be in contact with and learn to use the most advanced technologies in the world of archeology with professors from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

The second part will take place in the city of Barcelona, where we will carry out cultural and archaeological tours through the most important sites of the city. We will discover Barcino, the ancient Roman city located just in the center of the current city of Barcelona, and sites from the famous modernist architect Gaudí, such as the Park Güell and Sagrada Familia.

Click here for program flyer.

Contact infomation:

Adrià Millán
archaeoBarcelona, Director
adriamillan@ub.edu
www.archaeobarcelona.com
Street Tirso 42, 08023 - Barcelona

 

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Excavation: Roman Provincial - Life by the Imperial Road (Romania): June 1-July 5, 2014
Excavation: Roman Provincial - Life by the Imperial Road
Location: Rapolt, Hunedoara County (Southern Transylvania), Romania
Period: Imperial Roman - Provincial
Excavation dates: June 1 - July 5, 2014
More information: http://archaeotek.org/roman_provincial_settlement_excavation
Contact e-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org

Description: Our research area is situated between the richest gold deposits in Europe, the Dacian Kingdom’s political and religious capital and its fortified satellites in the Carpathian Mountains, and Sarmizegetusa Ulpia Traiana, the Roman capital of the Dacian provinces and the first Roman city North of the Danube, southwestern Transylvania was a highly integrated military, political, and economic region. During the Roman colonial occupation, 102-271AD, our target area around Simeria and Rapolt shows a very dynamic and intensive synthesis of Roman provincial life, where a multitude of processes of colonization and creolization take place side by side. Our project seeks to explore and understand the integration of all these structural provincial elements along the main Roman axes of communication and transport. Our excavations will aim at evaluating the importance and impact of the proximity of the main axis of movement, communication and commerce on the Roman provincial rural life, and its evolution through time. Click here for excavation flyer.

Our projects are designed as intensive hands-on field experience programs and, as such, are open for both credit student and non-credit participants. For more information on this program, see attached brochures or visit www.archaeotek.org .
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Excavation: Medieval Funerary - Lost Churches Project: Living and Dying on the Edge of Europe (Romania): Two Sessions - Session 1: June 8-July 5, 2014 - Session 2: July 6- July 26, 2014
Excavation: Medieval Funerary - Lost Churches Project: Living and Dying on the Edge of Europe
Location: Valeni, Harghita County (Central Transylvania), Romania
Period: Imperial Roman - Provincial
Excavation dates:
Session 1: June 8 - July 5, 2014
Session 2: July 6 - July 26, 2014
More information: http://archaeotek.org/medieval_funerary_excavation
Contact e-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org

Description: As the 15th century ends, the battle for Europe continues! The heroes (and their legend) that held back the Ottoman East have died: Vlad Dracula the Impaler in 1476; Holy Stephan the Great in 1504; Skanderberg in 1468. The fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the European defeat at the Battle of Mohacs in 1526 opened the way for the Ottoman expansion into Europe, all the way to the gates of Vienna. The Saxon fortresses and the Szekely armies managed to hold the Ottomans at bay as the Principality of Transylvania was born in 1570. Turkish pressure combined with the struggle between Catholicism and Protestantism has generated an extraordinary environment that impacted the local populations in a variety of ways, both physiologically and socio-culturally. During the 2014 season, we will continue to excavate the churches – and very well preserved associated cemeteries – that dramatically closed down at the end of the 17th century, to the point where they were erased from local collective memory. Our aim is to explore how major, global historical events are experienced at the local and personal (hence physiological) level, by the communities and individuals themselves. Click here for excavation flyer.

Our projects are designed as intensive hands-on field experience programs and, as such, are open for both credit student and non-credit participants. For more information on this program, see attached brochures or visit www.archaeotek.org .
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Osteology Workshop: Late Medieval ”Crisis” Populations – The Remaking of the European Frontier (Romania): June 8-July 5, 2014
Osteology Workshop: Late Medieval ”Crisis” Populations – The Remaking of the European Frontier
Location: Odorheiu Secuiesc, Transylvania, Romania
Dates: June 8 – July 5, 2014 (all level students)
More information: http://archaeotek.org/osteology_and_bioarch_workshop/osteology_workshop
Contact e-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org

Description: Running in conjunction with the Funerary Excavation (see above description), the aim of the osteology and bioarchaeology projects is to evaluate how major global political events impact physically the local Transylvanian populations . For that purpose, we will analyze the the relatively very well preserved human remains from ca. 200 adults and 100 children (ranging from prenatal to preadult) from four different cemeteries from central Transylvania (Romania), dating from the 16-17th centuries. Students will be taught how to identify fragmented bones, determine age, sex, stature, identify pathologies, trauma and take standard measurements. At the same time, they will be introduced to various osteological conservation methods and problems aiming at properly evaluate bone quality for DNA and isotope analysis as well as the potential (and limits) of analytical methods to answer real research questions. Click here for workshop flyer.

This workshop is followed by Bioarchaeology of Children Osteology Workshop: Victims of Change – Lost Churches Project

Our projects are designed as intensive hands-on field experience programs and, as such, are open for both credit student and non-credit participants. For more information on this program, see attached brochures or visit www.archaeotek.org.
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Bioarchaeology of Children Osteology Workshop: Victims of Change – Lost Churches Project (Romania): July 6-August 2, 2014
Bioarchaeology of Children Osteology Workshop: Victims of Change – Lost Churches Project
Location: Odorheiu Secuiesc, Transylvania, Romania
Dates: July 6 – August 2, 2014 (intermediary and advanced level students)
More information: http://archaeotek.org/osteology_and_bioarch_workshop/bioarchaeology_of_children_workshop
Contact e-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org

Description: Running in conjunction with the Funerary Excavation (see above description), the aim of the osteology and bioarchaeology projects is to evaluate how major global political events impact physically the local Transylvanian populations . For that purpose, we will analyze the the relatively very well preserved human remains from ca. 200 adults and 100 children (ranging from prenatal to preadult) from four different cemeteries from central Transylvania (Romania), dating from the 16-17th centuries. Students will be taught how to identify fragmented bones, determine age, sex, stature, identify pathologies, trauma and take standard measurements. At the same time, they will be introduced to various osteological conservation methods and problems aiming at properly evaluate bone quality for DNA and isotope analysis as well as the potential (and limits) of analytical methods to answer real research questions. Click here for workshop flyer.

This workshop is preceded by Late Medieval ”Crisis” Populations – The Remaking of the European Frontier

Our projects are designed as intensive hands-on field experience programs and, as such, are open for both credit student and non-credit participants. For more information on this program, see attached brochures or visit www.archaeotek.org.
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Irish Archaeology Field School --  13th century Black Friary (Ireland): May 12-August 15, 2014
The Irish Archaeology Field School is running its fifth season of excavations at the 13th century Black Friary this summer from May 12th to August 15th 2014. The field school is also part of a community archaeology project.

More information can be found by visiting www.iafs.ie.

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Archaeological Field School - Woodpecker Cave, Iowa (USA): May19-June 6, 2014
Archaeological Field School 113:199 (ANTH:3290)
3 semester hours credit
University of Iowa
May 19-June 6, 2014

Woodpecker Cave is a perfect first archaeological field experience, with a low threshold of accessibility for local students. The site is located at Coralville Reservoir, about 15 minutes north of Iowa City. The cave shows evidence of occupation from the Archaic Period, about 7,000 or 8,000 years ago, through the late Woodland Period, around 400 to 800 AD. Artifacts include pottery, stone tools, animal bones, mussel shells, fire-cracked rock and other artifacts.

Students will learn up-to-date techniques of excavation and recording, get experience in analysis and artifact curation, and gain skills that will serve in a wide variety of future of archaeological jobs. In particular, students will be trained on Electronic Distance Measurer (EDM) total station mapping through computer programs, both for topographic maps of the area and for recording precise 3-D locations of artifacts for studies of spatial structure. All necessary field equipment and recording forms for the field school will be supplied. Students will be evaluated based on participation, learning, and practice of excavation and recording techniques.

Students are responsible for their own lodging and meals. At 3 semester hours, everyone pays in-state resident tuition = $1123.50 plus a $150 fee for materials and for daily transportation to and from the site.

For further information, contact Jim Enloe, (319)335-0514 or james-enloe@uiowa.edu

View looking into Woodpecker Cave excavation site

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List your Archaeological Field School Here: Contact Kevin-Kelly@UIowa.Edu